Nursing Philosophy

Nurses provide a link between doctors, patients, and their families. However, every nurse should develop a nursing philosophy as it helps to explore personal values and principles of a nurse. Nursing philosophy guides the nursing practice and ensures proper care to all patients. In addition, it states thoughts about beliefs and nature of nursing professions and is a good basis for nursing activities. Proficient and qualified nursing requires clear and defined nursing philosophy as it is the key of successful nursing practice.

Nursing is a combination of numerous skills and practices. It embraces the development of scientific knowledge, individual thoughts, art, personal and professional values, devotion, and desire to sacrifice for the sake of others. Nursing revolves around care about each patient, respect, and human dignity. Nurses should support patients and their family members, as well as be professionals in the field of their work. Communication is a key to success in nursing as it helps in addressing all health care needs and enhances healthcare practice.

The primary purpose of nursing is to promote and maintain good health, prevent health-related diseases, and help others when necessary. Nurses are engaged in helping people to determine and attain social, mental, and physical potential. Nursing also presupposes the treatment of ill people, health promotion, and caring for patients taking into account conceptual models of nursing that help to create values and beliefs.

Nurses should provide a patient-centered care in any environment. They are responsible for a patient’s emotional, physical, cultural, and spiritual well-being. As nurses are concerned about comfort of every patient, it is vital for them to be able to work in a culturally diverse environment as patients who feel comfortable tend to cope better with their illness (Malinowski & Stamler, 2002). Nurses play an essential role in the life of any community and they care about the relationship building among people and health care providers. Their professional practice revolves around trust and relationship building with patients to establish open and trusting relationship that is vital for seeing and understanding the situation from the patient’s perspective. It also leads to realization of all patients’ values (Austgard, 2006).

Nursing presupposes a close relationship with other health care professionals. The practice of nursing is effective only in case of close and efficient collaboration with other health care providers. Therefore, this relationship should be open and trustful to fulfill patients’ needs. Ability to work in teams is essential for every nurse who seeks professionalism and good results. Developmental theory that is often used in nursing practice helps to outline the growth process, individual behavior and progress within different stages of treatment and communication (Nursing Theories: An Overview, 2013).

It is necessary for all nurses and nursing staff to treat all patients with dignity and humanity. It causes the need to be sensitive, to understand patients’ individual needs, and ensure proper care. Moreover, nurses manage risk and are aware of all potential risks to keep people safe in places where they provide health care.

Thus, nursing philosophy plays an essential role in nursing practice as it outlines professional beliefs, values, and attitude to patients. Nursing requires constant development of skills and knowledge to ensure proper care to all community members and to show the ability to work in health care teams. Modern nursing practice and philosophy is not based on hierarchal values and uses communication on a vertical level making team health care delivery a prominent patient care aspect. The principles that guide professional nursing practice help to better understand what is expected from nursing practice.

 

References

Austgard, K. (2006). The aesthetic experience of nursing. Nursing Philosophy 7: 11-19.

Malinowski, A., & Stamler, L.L. (2002). Comfort: exploration of the concept in nursing. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 39(6): 599–606.

Nursing Theories: An Overview (2013). Retrieved from http://currentnursing.com/nursing_theory/nursing_theories_overview.html

 

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